Yesterday I spent the entire day preparing for a vacation I’m about to take, but instead of cramming in as many words on my WIP (work in progress), I spent the day scheduling my tweets for the week. I have an unspoken rule with myself: in order for me to call a day “productive,” I must meet a minimum word-count requirement of 2K, ideally 3K. According to these terms, yesterday was a very unproductive day. When I think about it, Twitter and blogging are the two activities that normally hinder my word count on these less productive days. I began to wonder if I should reassess my definition of “productive.” Yes, writing is all about the writing, but there’s got to be a reason why I spend so much time tweeting and blogging.

For me, Twitter is like a water cooler. It’s were I go to mingle with other writers and to gather information on the industry. But Twitter can also be a time drain for many writers. I know this from personal experience. Far too often, Twitter is like my candy dish, as opposed to my water cooler. I know I shouldn’t reach into the dish every time I pass it, but I do.

When all is said and done, I am a writer and my loyalties rest with my word count. Yes, it’s okay to have a day or two of Twitter/blogging activities every so often, but anymore than that, and I’m only making it harder for myself to jump back into that WIP.

Here are some tips I’ve developed in attempt to keep myself from falling into the “Twitter Abyss”–that nasty state of wandering from tweet to tweet while ignoring your writing. I hope other writers will find these tips helpful in structuring their days and in improving word counts.

1) Know your ideal word count, and aim for 50-75% of it every day. To determine your ideal word count, pick a day without distraction (yeah, right), and write for 5-8 hours straight, taking a 10-15 minute break after each hour of writing. Make sure to have an outline for each scene before you start this day, and make sure to keep writing, no matter what, in between those sweet breaks. Your word count at the end of this session is your ideal word count (for now). Your ideal word count will most likely increase as your writing skills grow.  Now, calculate your daily word count goal. So, if you wrote 3K in 5 hours, then you should aim for a minimum of 1.5-2K words/day, 4-5X’s/week.

2) Post your daily word count on Twitter at the end of every day. I started doing this a few months ago, and having that public accountability has upped my sense of duty. I want to meet my word count because I know I will be posting it for others to see. This was terrifying for me at first, but now that I’ve been doing it, I can’t stop.

3) Host writing sprints on Twitter. If you’re dragging or feeling distracted, send out a tweet inviting others to join you for a writing sprint. Set the time. I like to do 30-60min sprints, during the afternoon. Ask participants to tweet their word count at the end of the sprint. Then, write. To illustrate, the last sprint I hosted was a half-hour lunch sprint in which participants wrote as many words as they could from 12:00-12:30p.m. EST (or something like that). This little sprint motivated me to write 500 words during that session, and I’m hoping it motivated others on toward their goals too. Just imagine how many words you could write per day with 3 one-hour sprint sessions.

4) Use TweetDeck to prioritize what tweets you actually read. HUGE TIME SAVER. I do this, and now, instead of weeding through tweets from the 1K+ accounts I follow, I can simply create a column for my top 40 accounts. I only see the tweets from those accounts, so I’m less tempted to keep scrolling through the endless feed from every account I follow. Okay, I still scroll through the endless feed sometimes.

5)Use a service like FutureTweets to schedule your tweets ahead of time. I find that I’m less tempted to search around on Twitter when I do this. I also feel less pressure to constantly log on, find something to tweet about, then tweet. I can take care of all my tweets in one or two sessions per day, and I don’t have to worry about killing my followers with a pile up of tweets at one time.

6) Twitter and/or blog on your breaks. At some point, you will need a break from your writing. I like to take mini breaks (5-10min) every hour, and a longish lunch break. Whenever I return form these breaks, I usually check my Twitter feed. Yes, these Twitter diversions sometimes take much longer than anticipated, so you might want to only check Twitter once every two hours or so.

The Key to Avoiding the Twitter Abyss

Whatever the case may be, I’d say that keeping yourself on the “write track” and not falling into the Twitter abyss boils down to 1)knowing your word count and 2)developing and sticking to a daily routine that helps you to maximize that word count. As much as writers may resist cliches, I can’t help but say it: The numbers don’t lie.

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